Social Media Slice for Friday, July 20, 2018

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Pricing Pages, Digital Detox and Your Face covered today. SLICE is a M-F news digest targeted to assist Social Media Managers and Small Business Owners doing their own marketing.


MAIN SLICE

Is your client’s pricing page under-performing? Interested in nine suggested best practices to ensure it does what it’s supposed to do— make sales happen? More


SLICE SPECIAL OF THE DAY

Do you need digital detox? Work. Work. Work. Consider JOMO to improve work-life balance. More


SLICE MOTIVATION


SLICE INGREDIENTS

Want to look ahead to your business day? Things like estimated travel time to work, meetings scheduled through calendar or trips? Android users may see a new “visual snapshot” of their day based on current time, location, and recent interactions. More


SLICE ON THE GO

Biometric boarding coming to Delta Airlines if you are flying out of Detroit. Your face is your ticket. More


And… if you are looking for a marketing promotion for your small business today: National Moon Walk Day and National Ugly Truck Day

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Social Media Slice for Thursday, July 19, 2018

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Emoji, empathy and cyber security are all in the news this morning. SLICE is a M-F news digest targeted to assist Social Media Managers and Small Business Owners doing their own marketing.


MAIN SLICE

Emoji Marketing Makes Money. New study shows positive results to increasing usage and engagement. More


SLICE SPECIAL OF THE DAY

Empathy Marketing is a powerful B2C tool to motivate customers of small biz. But can it work for the less emotional B2B target niche? More...


SLICE MOTIVATION


SLICE INGREDIENTS

Video you are good at, but stretching your time? Not so good. How about if I share with you an article that explains how to repurpose one video into content that can populate your blog, podcast, and multiple social channels? More...


SLICE ON THE GO

Hello? Can you hear me now? Hope not!!! Connecting your computer to airport Wi-Fi networks could leave you wide open to cybersecurity issues. Which are the least safe airports, according to a new study? More


And… if you are looking for a marketing promotion for your small business today: UV Safety Awareness Month and Get to Know Your Customers Day

Social Media Slice for Tuesday, July 10

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Pinterest has strong reach. Timehop has data breach. Those and other stories in today’s’ edition. SLICE is a M-F news digest targeted to assist Social Media Managers and Small Business Owners doing their own marketing.


MAIN SLICE

Pinterest. Can your client make $$ off it? Three influencers say yes you can. But you need to treat it as more than a repository for pictures. It is not Instagram. Pinterest is the number one shopping destination for millenials, a leading driver of website traffic, an online shopping hub, and a powerful search engine, Here are tips to maximize your presence on Pinterest. More


SLICE SPECIAL OF THE DAY

Security breach affecting 21 million users hits Timehop, a service that surfaces a user’s past social media content. Bad news: over 4 million phone numbers breached, along with usernames and email addresses. Good (?) news: no financial data affected, nor evidence of any improper account access at this point. More


SLICE MOTIVATION


SLICE INGREDIENTS

Knowing what the competition is doing provides you strategic advantage — especially on Facebook. I have posted tips before. Get ready, more to come. More.


SLICE ON THE GO

Shark Week on TV is having an effect in the air. No not the next installment of Sharknado! Southwest Airlines is rolling out 5 shark-themed designs on its Boeing 737 aircraft. Then use Flight Aware to track the flights, and share plane-spotting photos on Twitter with @SouthwestAir using the hashtag #SharksTakeFlight.” More


And… if you are looking for a marketing promotion today for your small business: July is National Picnic Month and today is Teddy Bear Picnic day. 

Dark Pattern Design Gets You Every Time — And That’s Not a Good Thing

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Pre-selected checkboxes. Need I say more? That is Dark Pattern Design. There is a perception vs reality chasm between what’s being offered on any given on-line option box and what the customer believes she/he is receiving.

If UX Design can be described as the process by which a designer tries to determine what a customer experience will be, then Dark Pattern Design can be defined as the creation of misleading conditions which will drive the customer to unknowingly act favorably towards a pre-determined experience.

Take a closer look at the featured graphic (from TechCrunch):

  • Opt in. Means you want to sign up for something
  • Don’t opt out. Means you also want to sign up for something
  • Don’t not opt in. Means… you… still… want to sign up for something.
  • Opt out all (grey scale, small type) Means you DO NOT want to sign up for something

Potential customers are in a hurry. They are irritated with all these questions. They just want some info. And so, they click one of the top three given options quickly. Dark Pattern Design just got them to sign up for a subscription or worse, opening the door to personal data being raided.

Manipulative timing is a key element of dark pattern design

Natasha Loma, writing in a July 1, 2018 piece in TechCrunch provides a rather extensive walk-through of the dangers to consumers of Dark Pattern Design, as well as the negative fallout to the reputations of business that are caught employing these deceptive practices. She slaps Facebook around quit often, and deservedly so, but by no means is FB the only internet company out there running a mis-direction shell game on customers.

She writes, “The technique, as it’s deployed online today, often feeds off and exploits the fact that content-overloaded consumers skim-read stuff they’re presented with, especially if it looks dull and they’re in the midst of trying to do something else — like sign up to a service, complete a purchase, get to something they actually want to look at, or find out what their friends have sent them.”

For example, let’s consider the ‘agree and continue’ button that pops up. Brightly colored. Can’t miss it. Click it to get to the next step and you have bypassed a service’s terms and conditions, and therefore signed off understanding what you’ve agreed to. Complain later? It was brightly colored. You could not miss it.

Same applies for those infamous pre-selected checkboxes. Right there, in plain sight. How did you miss it?

Contrast that with the rather lengthy Terms of Service options. On the surface, ToS appear to require being checked off one at a time, when there is instead one easily locatable opt out option buried at the end. That is called “friction.”

Deception is the long game that almost always fails in the end

With the massive negative publicity from the lack of clear opt outs during the Cambridge Analytica mess and the arrival of new stringent European watchdog legislation  (GDPR, anyone?), things may finally be changing.

Loma foresees “Rising mistrust, rising anger, more scandals, and — ultimately — consumers abandoning brands and services that creep them out and make them feel used. Because no one likes feeling exploited. And even if people don’t delete an account entirely they will likely modify how they interact, sharing less, being less trusting, less engaged, seeking out alternatives that they do feel good about using.”

As a Social Media Manager or Small Business Owner doing your own marketing, do you employee any of these Dark Pattern Design practices to mislead your customers? Whether you do or don’t, this TechCrunch article deserves your attention.

In dealing with moving your customer down the sales funnel what’s more important to you?

  • Opt in to make the sale
  • Opt out to build brand trust

{Your thoughts are ALWAYS welcome. Turn this into a conversation either here or on my Twitter account @amssvs}

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Which Is Worse: Facebook’s Poor Stewardship of Our Data or Its Lack of Transparency?

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For me, the cynically dark phrase “too big to fail” comes to mind in describing Facebook management’s precarious position in light of the current Cambridge Analytica News. “It’s not a data breach.” You say tomato and I say BS. Compound this situation with the targeted disinformation campaign lodged by Russian hackers to manipulate Facebook groups into organizing divisive political protests. Something bad happened during Facebook’s stewardship of our info, that we willingly gave them permission to collect.

Facebook was too big and powerful and too well run to make mistakes.

Just look at the bullet points of this CNBC article:

  •  Facebook’s reaction to a year of scandal has vacillated between defensive cluelessness and aloof silence.
  • Users are getting the message that information they post on Facebook can be used in ways they did not intend, and usage is starting to decline.
  • Meanwhile, executives are selling shares like crazy, including a plan by Mark Zuckerberg to sell almost $13 billion worth of shares by mid-2019.

Don’t just read the article, watch the video clip as well.

These areas should give readers and advertisers cause for concern. If you can’t trust Facebook’s word that your personal info is safe. If you can’t trust Facebook to own up/remedy quickly any breaches.  How can you trust anything FB tells you about reach and engagement data?

Ian MalcolmI “became an adult” during the Cold War. “Trust no one” and all that. In fact, I never had a FB page until I needed it to join Facebook groups. But, I never trusted this whole data mining / re-selling is good for business. (See Dr Ian Malcolm quote).

Anything and everything during the Cold War that could be turned into a weapon would be. It’s a lesson forgotten that painfully needs to be retaught. Data may be coin of the realm. But it is also power. And power corrupts in the wrong hands. As we are seeing in the headlines.

So, what happens now? Life goes on, but there is a price to be paid.

Which Is Worse: Facebook’s Poor Stewardship of our Data or Its Lack of Transparency? You decide.

I am advising my clients to scale down on FB and use an alternate means of engaging with readers & customers.

Small Business Saturday, You Got This

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Total reported spending reached an estimated $15.4 billion at independent retailers and restaurants for 2016’s version of Small Business Saturday. Woohoo!!! What will Nov. 24, 2017’s edition reveal as consumers are once again urged to shop small and visit the “mom & pop” locally-owned stores on Main Street USA?

That is up to you. Will you your small business be ready to engage with customers? Do you even know which customers to target with your ads? Hopefully your Social Media Mangers does. If not, I’ll give you a hint.

The 20-something’s

New survey from Coupons.com reports that during the 2017 holiday season this group plans to shop in-store more than any other age group.

Jeanette Pavini, Coupons.com savings expert reveals that “20-somethings are savvy, using technology to find the best deals, and knowing not every great deal is online.”

She should know, as understanding how consumers are motivated during key shopping seasons provides Coupons.com with data to translate into more relevant coupons at the right time.

And when you put a Mastercard survey’s results stacked against this one, it should be a great Saturday. Spending growth at mom and pop shops has outpaced that of the big chains in both of the past two years.

Why?

When Americans aren’t shopping online, it’s because they’re looking for more personal connections — and the advice they can receive from local SMBs. That’s the word from Sarah Quinlan, Mastercard, Inc. Senior Vice President.

Tech, on-line shopping, mobile apps, etc. may indeed be the wave of the future for mass shopping, but on an individual level– the community level– chatting with the clerk still holds weight. And when the consumer actually has the opportunity to speak with the store owner, well, that is, as they say money in the pocket.

Will you be working your products & services this Saturday?

6 Social Media Customer Engagement Guidelines Small Biz Should Follow

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Remember in the Pirates of the Caribbean movie when they talked about the “Pirates Code” being more like guidelines than rules? We have something similar in the Social Media world. There are some things that through trial and error we’ve learned you shouldn’t do— unless you want to drive away customers, followers, readers, etc. Not rules, but pretty good guidelines.

Posting is a big one. Don’t over post. Don’t under post. Don’t post irrelevant content. Posting content is what I do for clients, so I do have accumulated experience in this area.

To arrive at the above-mentioned findings, Sprout Social surveyed more than 1,000 Facebook, Twitter and Instagram users to determine what annoys them about brands on social and what drives them to unfollow.

Then the folks at CJG Digital Marketing sifted through the data to produce the following Infographic.

6 Social Media Behaviors to Avoid in 2017 (Infographic) - An Infographic from CJG Digital Marketing

(Embedded from CJG Digital Marketing )

Main thing to absorb is that 2.8 BILLION people use social media. If you are a small business owner or an entrepreneur THOSE are a lot of customers to be ignoring if you aren’t on line— and a lot to be ignoring if you are on social.

To repeat, the six no-no’s that Sprout Social focused on are:

  1. Posting too many promotional messages.
  2. Sharing irrelevant information
  3. Tweeting too frequently.
  4. Using jargon or slang awkwardly
  5. Staying too quiet
  6. Not replying to messages

Think about it and it makes sense. You are on social media not to scream from the rooftops about how good your service or product are. You are here to directly engage with potential customers, not to waste their time.

If you need help with consistent posting of blogs, FB posts or Twitter, feel free to contact me.